A Ride on the Tail of a Comet: A New Memoir by Steven Tyler



Sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll infused with metaphysics.

If you're offended by the F word or by illicit sex, then this book is not for you. If you want a book that reveals the mind of a musical genius in all of its drugged-out glory, then by all means pick up a copy of "Does the Noise in my Head Bother You?" [HarperCollins, $27.99], a memoir written by Steven (don't call him Steve) Tyler of Aerosmith fame.

Tyler, who played a major role in defining a generation of rock music as lead singer and songwriter for Aerosmith, takes the reader on a wild ("I live on the tail of a comet") ride through his life, with home base being the lakeside town of Sunapee, N.H. That's where he and guitarist Joe Perry hooked up and began their climb onto the international stage.

As much as you might be turned off by the book's excruciatingly honest description of the touring band's debauchery (Tyler calls it his "way-out-o-sphere"), you might also be impressed with what seems to be his deep understanding of life, one that's infused with the spiritual (he's a fan of Kahlil Gibran) and the literary (his mother's reading of Kipling and others when he was a child "lit the fire that would keep me warm for the rest of my life").

Tyler opens the door to a world we can only imagine and dares us to explore it with him. There are demons galore in this tale, but, as Tyler writes, "How do you expect me to write lyrics without demons?"

More book reviews you might be interested in

Where Beauty and Darkness Intersect

A high school counselor by day and photographer by night explores dark portraiture in "Michael Winters: Friends and Muses."

Graphic Tales

Joel Christian Gill reveals uncelebrated but important pieces of black history in his graphic novel "Strange Fruit, Volume 1."

Gloria Norris’ Journey From Nowheresville to “Kookooland”

Don't miss this life-is-stranger-than-fiction memoir from a New Hampshire filmmaker who now calls LA (aka Kookooland) home.

Using Whimsy to Teach About Dinosaurs

“We Thought You’d Never Ask” by Adele Maurier with illustrations by Peter Noonan uses humor and whimsy to teach children about life in the period that extends from the Triassic through the Cretaceous eras.

"As Simple As That" by Edie Clark

A collection of Edie Clark's essays that appeared over 25 years in Yankee Magazine.
Edit ModuleEdit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Popular Articles

  1. Steven Tyler Gives Back
    The rocker's new charity, Janie's Fund, benefits victims of child abuse and neglect.
  2. Best of NH 2016 Desserts, Ice Cream Stands, Coffee and Bakeries
    Ready for coffee and dessert? Step it up a notch with locally roasted brews, ice cream macarons,...
  3. Star maker Kathy Longsderff
    Kathy Longsderff of New England Models Group talks about the modeling industry in NH and the...
  4. Sugar Hill: The Place to Be This June
    June is the best time to catch the meadows of Sugar Hill lit up with blooming lupine. Here's your...
  5. The Inability to Smell Causes Big Issues
    A look into the causes of impairment of the sense of smell and the effects it can have on your life.
  6. Best of NH 2016 Food Odds & Ends
    Looking for the best vegan, vegetarian or gluten-free options? Want to find a local cheesemaker?...
  7. Building on Hope The Manchester Police Athletic League
    Neighbors have looked at the huge, boxy edifice for years without much thought, but the former...
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags