NH Antiques Week & A Dublin, NH, Wooden Souvenir Stein

If It's August... Mugs and more at Antiques Week



It’s August and, in the world of antiques in New England, that means one thing: New Hampshire Antiques Week is upon us! New Hampshire Antiques Week, held this summer from August 2–10, was established more than a half-century ago in the Manchester region. It has always been a fun highlight of the year for me as the week draws local, national and international dealers and collectors to buy and sell antiques. The week features a scheduled series of antique shows held at different locations in or near Manchester. These shows offer a unique opportunity to see, touch, buy, sell and learn about rare American antiques, with a focus on Americana, country and folk art. It is always exciting and proves that New Hampshire antiques can be as fantastic as New Hampshire maple syrup… well, almost!

I am thrilled that you sent in your photo of a Dublin, NH, wooden souvenir stein. This is such a great piece as it not only represents the Adirondack style from the early 20th century, but also tells a bit of Dublin’s history. In the late 1800s to early 1900s, Dublin, the heart of the Monadnock Region, was an area that was well-frequented by artists, musicians, writers and other notable celebrities.  During that period, everyone from the aviator Amelia Earhart to artist and writer Rockwell Kent would come to Dublin in the summertime. The region was also home to the renowned Dublin Art Colony.

The Adirondack style, which began in the 19th century, was a design movement in architecture, furniture and decorative objects that celebrated and reflected the rustic landscape of the Adirondack Mountains. Often incorporating natural tree and twig elements, the design was popularized by wealthy patrons of the 19th century who were designing and decorating their country and lake homes in a naturalistic style. This motif caught on with many craftsmen, architects and builders. The design trend became so popular that the term “Adirondack style” became a generic term for naturalistic camp/cottage architecture and furniture. Your Adirondack style stein is formed from a tree branch and twigs, with some of the bark still remaining, truly indicative of the Adirondack movement. It is a great example of a 1920s souvenir, which would have been a popular keepsake for folks summering in the lake regions of New Hampshire.

Your mug, or stein, is a wonderful example of a cottage design souvenir from its time period. It dates to the early 20th century, has a transfer decorated moose on one side and is hand lettered “Dublin, N.H.” on the other. I would value it at $125.

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