Ken Burns - Civil Warrior

Above: Photo courtesy of Dan Klores Communications He swore, after producing “The Civil War,” he would never do another documentary about war. But 17 years later the legendary Ken Burns of Walpole was persuaded to do another by the aging and dying of WWII veterans — seeing the loss of their stories as “historical amnesia too irresponsible to countenance.” The autumn airing of “The War” was designed in part to inspire individuals to interview veterans they know, to help in compiling an extensive oral history of “the greatest generation.” As with many cultural happenings, it’s hard to tell where the cause ends and the effect begins, but the country’s interest in the WWII era is peaking just as the series saturates the airwaves. Once again Burns is emerging as the perfect tour guide into the riches and the horrors of America’s past.
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