Mission Statement

“We enhance stockholder value through strategic business initiatives by empowered employees working in new team paradigms.”



Editor Rick Broussard

Photo by John Hession

Assuming you are still reading and haven’t dozed off, that mission statement was stolen, verbatim, from a panel of Scott Adam’s “Dilbert” comic strip. So, yes, it’s a joke, but it’s a timely one.

This May 2016 issue of New Hampshire Magazine is the “reveal” of our new redesigned pages and layout. The redesign process began last year and it’s the first serious overhaul in more than a decade. We didn’t go through all that soul searching and effort just to conduct a facelift or to update our corporate mission statement. 

That said, we ARE a magazine on a mission, so this really is a good time to reaffirm our commitment to “stockholder value,” assuming that you, the readers, are our stockholders. And that’s not too far from the truth, since the stock we’re dealing with here is stories of the people, places, things and opportunities that reside within the contours of our state.

In the past three decades that this publication has been around, the Granite State has managed to completely reinvent itself, transforming its once-quaint cities into hip, sophisticated destinations and rebranding its glorious natural resources for a generation that seeks out backpacking trails and ziplines under the hashtag “ecotourism.” Meanwhile, the population has swelled with folks from elsewhere to where now only a minority of state inhabitants claim residency as a birthright. As the simulated telepathy of the Internet and social media has made the world (and the state) an open book, it has also stolen the focus and shortened the attention span needed to lean back and enjoy the stories in that book.

The mission of New Hampshire Magazine is to reacquaint old-timers with their state in a time of change. It’s to illuminate the entry points for newcomers wanting to put down roots and create their own traditions. It’s to serve as a soothing tonic for a gadget-driven, light-speed communications world by enticing a reader to sit a spell and chat, learn the lay of the land, survey the vistas, get to know the local leaders and quirky characters. It’s to share our love of this place with other lovers.

We truly think the Granite State is the best place to live in the entire universe and that magazines are the supreme medium for connecting people with things they love. The changes in this redesigned issue are all designed to help us better convey those convictions to you and to anyone curious enough to pick us up on the newsstand, subscribe or even check us out online. Look them over and if you think there are other ways to improve, then we welcome your comments.

I guess you could say that’s our paradigm of strategic empowerment.

More edit notes from editor Rick Broussard

Kindred Spirits

There was a death in my family just as the year was turning and it was an emotional time on every level, but through all the stress and grief, one member of our clan kept her composure.

The Future on Wheels

For me, the future arrived back in the 1960s. It came on wheels, packed with books, and when the door opened, it smelled like a cool breeze from heaven: It was an air-conditioned bookmobile.

Listening to Amy & Andy

Just 150 years ago, one of the most illustrious female orchestral composers in American history was born in Henniker. It’s sad to think that most Granite Staters have never heard her music.

Working on the World

The news told of the horrors of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, but I kept thinking about the brave work of first responders, volunteers and hospital personnel in the wake of such a nightmare.

When Hope Must HIde

Building on Hope, a remarkable effort that began in a conference room here at our offices, has a new extreme makeover project — but for this one, the location has to remain a secret.
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