Riddle in Rindge: A Quest for Answers

An intriguing and scary tale of a couple living on a farm in Rindge in 1817



It's an unusual book - not only is each page of text in "The Old Rindge House: An Examination of a New Hampshire Legend" set within an illustrated border, the thrust of the book isn't the legend itself but an examination of it. Plus, it shifts mid-book from fiction to non-fiction.

Despite that - or maybe because of it - the book is intriguing.

It deals with the scary tale of a couple living on a farm in Rindge in 1817, a surprise guest who is a mural painter and what happens to them during a cold, dark New Hampshire winter.

But, as I said, it's not so much about the scary tale as it is the author Eric Stanway's fascination with it. It starts with him discovering an old newspaper clipping - "The Ghostly Mystery of Old

Rindge House" - in a local knick-knack shop. Captivated, he researches the story, the time period and the people who had earlier written about it (this occupies much of the second half of the book). He searches for and finds the location of the now-gone house.

His intent, though, was not to create his own story line. It was, he said, to show that history "isn't just names and dates in dusty old books, but the lives of real people." He also wanted to, as a Dickens' character said, "make your flesh creep."

He accomplishes both.

Edit ModuleEdit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Popular Articles

  1. Building Homes for a Greener Tomorrow
    There’s nothing gothic about the net-zero home of environmental reporter Sam Evans-Brown and...
  2. Medical Marijuana
    There's still no consensus on its effectiveness.
  3. The Search for NH's Best Pizza
    Lots of places claim to have the state's best pizza. We put them all to the test.
  4. Tiny House, Tremendous Style
    Living small takes creativity.
  5. Live Long and Prosper
    A local filmmaker explores “Star Trek” icon Leonard Nimoy’s legacy
  6. Fashion Statements in the Granite State
    There's more to our state's style than you think.
  7. Over-the-Border Dining in Kittery
    Drive, bike, walk or skip over Memorial Bridge to take in the dining renaissance underway in the...
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags