The Farm Bar and Grille

Offering comfort food with a BBQ twist and nightlife



A new restaurant is trying to make a go of it in the former Wings Your Way building on the corner of Elm and Bridge Street in Manchester. Nothing has really seemed to make it for very long in the large space - it has a dining room, two bar areas and a patio in warmer months - but with a menu that is sure to appeal to a wide range of diners, The Farm Bar & Grille just might be the one.

The style of dish here is comfort food with a barbeque twist. Intermingled with the usual suspects such as fish and chips ($14), meatloaf ($14) and a traditional turkey dinner ($14) are a number of BBQ options that feature their house-made sauce.

Keeping things interesting are entrées such as fish tacos ($14), grilled salmon ($17) and a ravioli of the day ($15). You can also start with seared tataki tuna ($12).

For those looking to stop in for a bite at the bar, there is a nice list of beers both on tap and in the bottle, plus a cocktail menu. Burgers, sandwiches and other pub fare like beer-battered pickles ($6) make this a great spot to watch the game while enjoying bar food that's a bit more creative and adventurous than the usual options.

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