Answer Man - Noah Sheola




Noah Sheola works for Zipcar in Somerville, Mass., now, but he grew up in the Granite State and graduated from Contoocook High. He was involved in the Portsmouth theatre scene, writing and acting as well as performing in the award-winning improv comedy troupe Stranger than Fiction. Every budding thespian dreams of a moment on a national stage, to show off in front of an audience of millions, but not many plan on having to be quizzed on American History or Potent Potables to get the chance. Still, when Noah got the call to appear on the game show "Jeopardy," he was ready, willing and able. The episode featuring him will appear on March 4. Were you a "Jeopardy" nerd growing up? Yeah, I definitely was. I watched with mom when I was little and I always thought it was cool. By the time I was in college I didn't watch a lot of TV so I forgot about it. Is it hard to get on the show? Some people audition over and over and never get on. "Jeopardy" superstar Ken Jennings tried multiple times. About once a year there's a big online test. People are selected on how well they do, but to some extent it has to be random. A hundred thousand or so people take the test, so by some secret formula they select the people they invite to an in-person audition. They have a mini version of the game set up and are looking for people who can smile and project and move the game along. You got in on your first try. Did your improv training help you out? Yes, a lot of people with theatre or show-biz backgrounds get on for that reason. How did you prepare? I started studying my almanac, presidents, state and world capitals, and I watched the show more. I read books by two former "Jeopardy" champs, brushed up on sports because I consider that a weakness and read up on opera. That one comes up a lot. What weren't you prepared for? What I didn't appreciate and what you don't realize when watching at home is that it's such a game of reflexes. Most of the time all three players know the answer and it's just a matter of who can ring in the fastest. Also, those who have been on the show say it goes by fast and that was certainly true. They tape five shows a day and there's no commercial break time on the set, so live it's less than 20 minutes. OK, Noah, you've chosen the category "Hot Off the Press" for $1,000 and the "Jeopardy" answer is: "This beloved publication is the essential guide to living in New Hampshire." Uh, what is New Hampshire Magazine? You're good. Hopefully, you won big bucks. Well, we'll find out on March 4.
Edit ModuleEdit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Popular Articles

  1. Washington New Hampshire
    Washington is one of New Hampshire’s most overlooked towns, and it also happens to be one of...
  2. Pets to the Rescue
    Some animals are more than pets — they can comfort, teach and assist their humans in a number...
  3. A Closer Look at NH's Own Seth Meyers
    The “Late Night” host returns to New Hampshire for a good cause
  4. Dining Off the Beaten Path in Portsmouth
    The up-and-coming Islington Street in Portsmouth's West End has it all - except the big crowds.
  5. Guide to Retirement Living and Continuing Care
    The concept of retirement and senior living is not what it once was.
  6. Preserving the Old Ways
    Winter logging by horse is obsolete, but North Country native is keeping it alive.
  7. Vermin Supreme
    Getting to know the fringe presidential candidate who has been running for office since 1992
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags