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Braided Geometry A new twist on an old craft Braided rugs that look at home in a contemporary setting get their precise patterns with special techniques. Sandy Luckury, of Bradford, butts the ends of each row instead of braiding in a spiral, to create tidy geometric shapes, including hexagons and squares. By counting the loops, the corners are neat and the rugs are compelled to lay flat. These techniques were first developed by Barbara Fisher of the Braided Rug Shop in Sunapee. Fisher, at 82, continues to braid and teach in her shop. Luckury, a former student of Fisher, started braiding rugs 21 years ago and soon realized it was what she wanted to do. Eventually, she was able to leave her banking job and braid full time. The rugs are made with a unique braid that plies five strips of wool instead of four. Luckury usually uses wool from the Dorr Mill shop in solids and tweeds or other patterns that create visual interest. The rugs are hefty, sturdy and reversible. She says they will last “forever.” Most of her work is done on commission for $42 to $63 a square foot. — Susan Laughlin Sandy Luckury Bradford 938-5530 sluckury@conknet.com
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