Architectural Glass




You can see the 1920s influence in George Ponzini’s stemware and sculpture glass works. He gleaned the Art Deco aesthetic from studying architecture and the materials from time spent working with stained glass. Unlike a glassblower using molten glass, Ponzini uses fabricated rods, marbles and sheets of glass. Instead of lead joints to create a flat pattern, he uses a transparent, ultraviolet-sensitive glue to create three-dimensional glass designs. To Ponzini the form is key. In fact, his first series in the 1990s was strictly in black and clear glass. By limiting color choices, he was able to focus on the elements of line and shape. Since then, he has added etched patterns, color in a few limited palettes and a sandblasted finish. He calls the addition of color his “Neo Deco” line. With transmissions and refractions of light changing with the viewing angle, the designs “follow you around the room.” His production line also includes mirror trays, martini sets, perfume bottles, candlesticks and even a fabricated glass chess set. His latest one-of-a-kind project involves up-scaling his bowl design into a table. George Ponzini Keene (603) 357-2474 Represented by NJM (Not Just Mud) Gallery in Portsmouth (603) 433-4120 www.artglassusa.com 1 Candlesticks, $90 each for 10-inch and $120 each for 12-inch 2 Stemware, $65 3 Mirror trays, $92 for small (11x16 inches) and $225 for large (approx. 16x24 inches)
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